Call for/and Response: Emergent Critical Analytics for Alternative Humanities

Amy K King and Chris A Eng

To formally reflect the project of imagining institutionality otherwise toward alternative humanities, this forum will stage conversations between established scholars and emerging scholars (students and junior faculty). Conventional institutional structures often premise a generational approach that privileges linear models of academic development, which can often be reproduced even within formal and informal practices of mentorship. In contrast, we aim to lateralize this relationship by juxtaposing comments by scholars across various institutional positions and intellectual trajectories side-by-side so that unexpected new relationalities may arise from these collaborations. In what ways might the stakes and uses of these analytics—settler colonialism, new materialisms, disability, and institutionality—in research and teaching shift based on one’s professional position and locale? How might students, recent graduates, contingent faculty, nontenured or junior scholars approach these analytics otherwise?

To further contemplate these inquiries, we now solicit responses (1000-2000 words), especially from emergent student and junior faculty voices. Submissions may (a) respond to one or more of the four analytics posed here or (b) propose another analytic in line with the objectives outlined in this forum. Responses should be submitted for consideration to Chris A. Eng (ceng@gradcenter.cuny.edu) and Amy K. King (aking83@gatech.edu) by October 1, 2016. We invite further conversations to collectively reflect on and strategize about the continual practices needed for these emergent critical analytics and the models necessary for materializing alternative humanities.
Amy K King

Amy K King

Amy K. King is a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her current book project places depictions of women at the center of her inquiry to interrogate women’s involvement in empires throughout the "New World." King argues that a substantial number of recent written and visual texts employ depictions of violence between women in the Caribbean and US to illuminate grotesquely violent cultural norms enacted on and continuing beyond the setting of the plantation. Portions of this work appear in the edited collection Reading/Speaking/Writing the Mother Text: Essays on Caribbean Women’s Writing (Demeter Press 2015). King also has two essays forthcoming in Mississippi Quarterly and south: a scholarly journal that reconsider comparative methodologies for hemispheric American studies.
Chris A Eng

Chris A Eng

Chris A. Eng received his Ph.D. in English from The Graduate Center, City University of New York. At CUNY, he co-founded The Mentoring Future Faculty of Color Project and served on the Board of Directors for CLAGS: Center for LGBTQ Studies, during which he chaired the programming committee and coordinated the year-long event series “Q of Life.” Chris is also an alumni and board member of the Institute for Recruitment of Teachers (IRT), Andover. His project Dislocating Camps explores the entanglements between state power and queer aesthetics in multiple camp formations across Asian/America. He will be a Chancellor’s Post-Doctoral Research Associate in the department of Asian American Studies at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In fall 2017, he will be joining Syracuse University as Assistant Professor of English and the Emerson Faculty Fellow.